Archive for May, 2011

Physician Jobs in Canada

One of the many questions we get at PJC is what provinces are open to internationally trained physicians (IMG’s)? And should I be looking for a full time jobs or would it be better to consider a part time position, i.e. a locum opportunity?

To answer that question requires a short preamble first. If we were to look at the history of IMG’s in Canada we would see that it essentially started in the early 70”s. The provinces that were fist to accept Medical education outside of North America were Newfoundland , Saskatchewan, and the Maritime provinces, i.e. Nova Scotia , New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, however at a much less degree than the first two provinces . Today, foreign trained physicians are get jobs in various disciplines and are accepted in every province and territory in Canada. Still the most active and “easiest of entry” provinces would be the afore mentioned first two provinces.

Given the upgraded medical standards internationally, it has allowed for an active and dynamic immigration of IMG’s. Canada is in serious need of medical doctors today and that vacancy of jobs trend is expected to increase 10 fold over the next 20- 25 years. The basic question a doctor / physician has to ask themselves is what level of commitment they have in coming to Canada. The reason that’s important is because even the so –called easy provinces have a North American standard of medical treatment and patient care. Some of the benefits of a less populated province for jobs, are is it allows for an ease of entry into North American medicine in a more laid back environment. Also, most of the smaller provinces have a higher demand and will offer more benefits than larger ones for improving one’s medical education through the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada or the College of Family Physicians of Canada .
At this point each province has a wide difference in licensure policy and ease of entry varies. Ontario , British Columbia and Alberta probably have the most stringent requirements. However there is a move to change policy in each of these provinces as we speak allowing for equitable job opportunities across Canada. In fact, the federal government of Canada is hoping to have in place by the end of 2012 a national standard for all provinces with respect to Internationally trained medical doctors/ physicians. But for now we will have to work with the individual policies of all provinces and territories.
As for the second question of the pursuit of locums verses full time jobs for IMG’s this will be addressed in an article to be posted in www.physicianlocumscanada.com under the title of Locums or Full time Jobs: As an Internationally trained physician or doctor what should I be pursuing.

We hope this information was useful. Please check back regularly for useful and informative information. Questions ? Contact info@physicianjobscanada.com

Doctor Careers in Canada

Doctor Careers in Canada

One of the many questions we get at PJC is what provinces are open to internationally trained physicians (IMG’s)? And should I be looking for a full time jobs or would it be better to consider a part time position, i.e. a locum opportunity?

To answer that question requires a short preamble first. If we were to look at the history of IMG’s in Canada we would see that it essentially started in the early 70”s. The provinces that were fist to accept Medical education outside of North America were Newfoundland , Saskatchewan, and the Maritime provinces, i.e. Nova Scotia , New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, however at a much less degree than the first two provinces . Today, foreign trained physicians are get jobs in various disciplines and are accepted in every province and territory in Canada. Still the most active and “easiest of entry” provinces would be the afore mentioned first two provinces.

Given the upgraded medical standards internationally, it has allowed for an active and dynamic immigration of IMG’s. Canada is in serious need of medical doctors today and that vacancy of jobs trend is expected to increase 10 fold over the next 20- 25 years. The basic question a doctor / physician has to ask themselves is what level of commitment they have in coming to Canada. The reason that’s important is because even the so –called easy provinces have a North American standard of medical treatment and patient care. Some of the benefits of a less populated province for jobs, are is it allows for an ease of entry into North American medicine in a more laid back environment. Also, most of the smaller provinces have a higher demand and will offer more benefits than larger ones for improving one’s medical education through the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada or the College of Family Physicians of Canada .
At this point each province has a wide difference in licensure policy and ease of entry varies. Ontario , British Columbia and Alberta probably have the most stringent requirements. However there is a move to change policy in each of these provinces as we speak allowing for equitable job opportunities across Canada. In fact, the federal government of Canada is hoping to have in place by the end of 2012 a national standard for all provinces with respect to Internationally trained medical doctors/ physicians. But for now we will have to work with the individual policies of all provinces and territories.
As for the second question of the pursuit of locums verses full time jobs for IMG’s this will be addressed in an article to be posted in www.physicianlocumscanada.com under the title of Locums or Full time Jobs: As an Internationally trained physician or doctor what should I be pursuing.

We hope this information was useful. Please check back regularly for useful and informative information. Questions ? Contact info@physicianjobscanada.com

Job Opportunities for International Medical Graduates in Canada

One of the many questions Physician Jobs Canada gets on a regular basis is what if any changes are coming with respect to licensure policy for IMG’s wishing to come to Canada. At this point we can categorically state that there is a federal agency in place looking to standardize licensure policy is Canada. It’s scheduled to be in place by the Fall of 2012. The individual province’s College of Physicians will of course need to give up a lot of power which exits at present, but will hold on to minor differences with respect to licensure policy. This, we hope, will make the process much easier. We will keep you updated on a regular basis as to new information on this landmark change for IMG’s.

Highlights of the new Manitoba Initiative for IMG’s

The key points of the new program include:

Specialized language development and training, in collaboration with the Red River College, allowing IMGs to study English in a medical environment.

Admission to a three-week prep. course at the University of Manitoba for medical students who are about to write national licensing exams with the Royal College or CFPC.

For those wishing to practise as family physicians, access to a skills enhancement program, allowing the applicant to take up to three rotations in a one-year period.

Ready availability to a conditional registration of a medical licence, giving the applicants up to five years to complete full national licensing exams whilst practising medicine.

Income and expense support to help physicians support themselves and their families while pursuing a medical licence.

Commencing a provincial skills assessment, physicians are allowed a one year period to attend up to three hospital resident rotations. If, after another assessment, they still have not demonstrated adequate skills, they will be allowed to repeat one rotation.

Those who meet the essential requirements of skills assessment will be allowed to practise medicine under a conditional licence issued by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba. Within five years, the doctor will be expected to complete the second part of the national licensing examination, which is standard policy for anyone wishing to practise medicine in the country of Canada.

In the future, the province will attempt to move those doctors who cannot meet the requirements for a conditional licence into other allied health and support professions, such as radiation therapy, nursing or laboratory technician.

Sources say it could cost more than $82,000 for each IMG who successfully completes the program. The costs include $47,000 for evaluating and licensing examinations, skills assessment and language training, and another $35,000 for income support.

Barbara Hague, who is the director of workforce policy for Manitoba Health, wouldn’t discuss specifics of the new system but noted any IMG licensing system must include measures to ensure applicants meet all professional standards to practice in Canada.

Physicians will still be expected to complete a national clinical skills evaluating examination, as well as a two-part licensing examination. All of which are currently required for anyone wishing to practise medicine in Canada, regardless of what country the IMG was trained in.

This represents a great opportunity for Physician Jobs Canada to welcome IMG’s into this country providing them with leading edge knowledge of licensure policy as it relates to each province. Our ultimate goal is to work the IMG contacts into permanent positions in Canada.

Manitoba Aims is to ease doctor shortage; program to offer training and Income Support.

Foreign trained doctors (IMG’s) will soon find the process much easier to work with in Manitoba, thanks to a newly established provincial licensure program that’s in development.

This program is aimed to lessen the province’s doctor shortage and to address the humanitarian needs of International Medical Graduates (IMG’s). And when fully implemented, it will make Manitoba one of the most progressive jurisdictions in the United States and Canada for the licensing of foreign-trained medical doctors.

Sources have confirmed the new initiative, still in its genesis phase, involves language training, clinical skills assessment and upgrading. It also involves some level of income support for participants until they receive licensure and are granted the ability to start practice. Dr. Bill Pope, elected president of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Manitoba, said the new program will dramatically streamline the process for qualified international medical doctors. The system would also offer the public ample assurance that all doctors have met Canadian standards. “What we’re trying to do is provide a system that allows for individuals with potential to undergo an assessment process in which we have confidence,” said Pope. “I think this could be quite benificial for all parties.”

Doctors arriving in Canada as immigrants or refugees are often times discouraged from seeking a medical licensure. Those still wishing to pursue a career in medicine must negotiate a complicated and costly series of evaluating and licensing examinations, without provincial (government) aid for language or academic upgrading. For those who pass the examinations, there still exists barriers. In both Canada and the United States, foreign-trained doctors are required to perform up to two years in a hospital residency program. However, they have generally been systemically excluded from the resident programs, creating a challenging catch-22 situation.

As immigrants with little financial resources, these doctors are expected to pay their examination fees and other academic costs without the support of government. Interestingly, The Manitoba Human Rights Commission is considering a complaint from a resident of that province who claims he’s been denied a medical licence because of systemic discrimination. Some in the government believe foreign-trained doctors weren’t given a fair chance to prove they have the skills and knowledge to practice medicine in Manitoba or Canada.
And with a North American shortage of physicians, Chomiak said he wants to make it a priority to open up new opportunities for the foreign medical graduates.

The Association of Foreign Medical Graduates would not comment on the new initiative until all its members had been consulted. However, a majority of foreign-trained doctors are still somewhat skeptical about the province’s plans. The province’s proposal will does very little for those already living in Manitoba who may have been out of practice for many years. There is also a concern the province has done little or nothing to deal with concerns about the national residency matching service that is the focal point of complaints of systemic discrimination.

As it stands today, international medical graduates (IMGs) are not allowed to compete for residency positions with Canadian graduates in the initial round of the national resident matching service. IMGs are only allowed to compete in a second round, but few have found residency positions through that avenue.

Any step forward is progressive. But this is seen as a modest step forward for a minority of IMGs. The system still discriminates against IMGs. This IMG initiatve presents a real opportunity for Physician Jobs Canada and the Manitoba Government to work towards a common recruitment goal.

The highlights of this program will be released in the next few weeks.